Etiology Of Avascular Necrosis Of Femoral Head In Population Of Malwa Region In Madhya Pradesh

  • Choudhari P Department of Orthopaedics, Sri Aurobindo Institute of Medical Science & Post Graduate Institute, Indore (M.P.)
  • Deshpande M Department of Orthopaedics, Sri Aurobindo Institute of Medical Science & Post Graduate Institute, Indore (M.P.)
  • Jain N Department of Orthopaedics, Sri Aurobindo Institute of Medical Science & Post Graduate Institute, Indore (M.P.)
  • Prajapati R Department of Orthopaedics, Sri Aurobindo Institute of Medical Science & Post Graduate Institute, Indore (M.P.)
Keywords: Avascular necrosis, Osteonecrosis, Malwa region

Abstract

Background: Osteonecrosis is characterized by bone cell death following, decrease in blood supply to the bone due to traumatic or non-traumatic cause. We evaluated the etiology of osteonecrosis of femoral head in population of Malwa region of Madhya Pradesh.

Material and Methods: This longitudinal study was conducted from January 2018 to Jan 2020 in patients diagnosed with avascular necrosis of femoral head, which were evaluated, examined and investigated to know the etiology of the disease.

Results: 70 cases with mean age of 39 years (55 males and 15 females) were included. Bilateral involvement was seen in 20 (29%) cases, whereas 50 (71%) cases had unilateral involvement. Idiopathic AVN was most common cause of the osteonecrosis as seen in 27 (39%) cases followed by steroid induced AVN in 12 (17%), post traumatic in 13 (19%) cases, alcohol induced in 8 cases (11%), both alcohol and steroid induced in 2 (3%) cases and sickle cell anaemia was seen in 8 (11%) cases.

Conclusion: Our results showed that most common cause of osteonecrosis of femoral head in population of Malwa region of Madhya Pradesh is idiopathic followed by trauma, steroid induced and then alcoholism or sickle cell anemia. Most commonly affected people are in age group of 26-40 years with male preponderance. Appearance of disease is more, unilateral as compared to bilateral.

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Published
2020-12-16
How to Cite
1.
Choudhari P, Deshpande M, Jain N, Prajapati R. Etiology Of Avascular Necrosis Of Femoral Head In Population Of Malwa Region In Madhya Pradesh. ojmpc [Internet]. 2020Dec.16 [cited 2021Jan.21];26(2):90-4. Available from: https://ojmpc.com/index.php/ojmpc/article/view/125
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Original Article